Games galore

This week is International Games Week, which celebrates all things ludic, including board games, card games and video games. It is “a great opportunity for public, school and academic libraries to introduce fun activities and raise awareness of the social and educational benefits of play” (Australian Library and Information Association, n.d.). As a starting point for developing a collection for a children’s library, here are some classic board games that have stood the test of time (plus a fabulous card game, which comes highly recommended by my nieces).

Cluedo

Reclusive millionaire Samuel Black’s been murdered in his mansion! Now, it’s up to you to crack the case! Question everything to unravel the mystery. Who did it? Where? And with what weapon? Ransack the mansion for clues, ask cunning detective questions and leave no card unturned. Solve the murder first to win! Fun twist on the classic mystery game features new characters and a two-player version!

For 2 to 6 players.

Ages 8 and up.

(Synopsis by Hasbro)

As well as the traditional version of the game, there is also Cluedo: Harry Potter edition for wizards and muggles to play. One of the students has vanished from Hogwarts and it is up to the players (eg. Harry and Hermione) to work out who did it (eg. Draco Malfoy and Bellatrix Lestrange), how (eg. the vanishing cabinet and mandrake) and where (eg. the owlery and the potions classroom). There are also different types of cards: allies, spells and the Dark Mark. Along with the ability to gain and lose house points, these help to make the game more enjoyable for Harry Potter fans. And for younger players, there is Cluedo Junior, where the mystery that needs to be solved is not a murder, but the case of the missing cake!

Monopoly

Monopoly

Monopoly by William Warby: CC BY 2.0

This version of the Monopoly game welcomes the Rubber Ducky, Tyrannosaurus Rex, and Penguin into its family of tokens. Choose your token, place it on GO! and roll the dice to own it all! There can be only one winner in the Monopoly game. Will it be you?

For 2 to 8 players.

Ages 8 and up.

(Synopsis by Hasbro)

There are many versions of Monopoly, catering for a wide range of interests. These include Star Wars, Game of Thrones and London Olympics 2012. There are also regional versions, such the Australian one, which include local landmarks and tokens. As with Cluedo, there is a junior game. The edition I’ve played is based on a fairground with properties ranging from the balloon stand to the roller coaster.

Guess Who?

Guess Who?

035/365 by Brad Slavin: CC BY-NC 2.0

It’s the Guess Who? game-the original guessing game! This Guess Who? game goes back to the tabletop style boards, styled after the original, rather than handheld boards. Each player chooses a mystery character and then using yes or no questions, they try to figure out the other player’s mystery character. When they think they know who their opponent’s mystery character is, players make a guess. If the guess is wrong, that player loses the game! Players can also challenge opponents to a series of games in the Championship Series, where the first player to win 5 games is the Guess Who? champion.

For 2 players.

Ages 6 and up.

(Synopsis by Hasbro)

Guess Who? enables younger children to develop higher order thinking skills through logic and problem solving. This prepares them for playing more complex games like Cluedo. There are no additional editions of the game, but it is possible to download and print alternative character sheets, such as one based on The Littlest Pet Shop.

Scrabble

Scrabble

Scrabble by Jacqui Brown: CC BY-SA 2.0

Scrabble is the ultimate crossword game in which every letter counts. Grab your friends and take turns forming words on the board. After playing your turn, count the value of all the letters in every new word that you formed. Don’t forget the bonus points for placing letters on premium squares. Double letter! Triple word! It’s all about playing words on the high-scoring hotspots to get ahead. Played a Q on a triple-letter score? Your score just got a lot bigger. Use all your 7 tiles in one turn, and score a whopping 50 points in addition to your word score! Knowing the rules and a few tricks will help you to score more points and improve your chances of winning. At the end of the game, the player with the highest score wins.

For 2 to 4 players.

Ages 8 and up.

(Synopsis by Hasbro)

Whilst Scrabble is a great way of developing and expanding vocabulary, Junior Scrabble helps children to develop confidence in creating words from their seven random letters. In this version, the double-sided board means that novice players can begin by using the crosswords-style side, placing their tiles on the pre-formed words. As they become more experienced, they can flip the board and use the blank grid to make their own words. The scoring has also been simplified to prevent children from becoming overwhelmed.

Yahtzee

Yahtzee

Yahtzee by liz west: CC BY 2.0

A family favourite for over 40 years!  Throw the dice to build straights, full houses, five of a kind-YAHTZEE!

For 1 or more players.

Ages 8 and up.

(Synopsis by Hasbro)

I’ve played Animal Yahtzee by Haba, which is a simpler version of the original game. Instead of dots, the dice have animals on their faces: a snake, camel, tiger, elephant, monkey and parrot. As with Yahtzee, the aim is to throw combinations, such as three-of-a-kind, full house and, of course, Yahtzee! This is a great way of introducing younger children to  the timeless game.

Sorry!

Sorry!

Sorry by frankieleon: CC BY 2.0

Slide, collide and score to win the game of Sorry! Draw cards to see how far you get to move one of your pawns on the board. If you land on a Slide you can zip to the end and bump your opponents’ pawns-or your own! Jump over pawns and hide in your Safety zone while getting powers with the 2 power-up tokens. Keep on moving and bumping until you get all three of your pawns from your color Start to your color Home. But watch out, because if you get bumped, Sorry! It’s all the way back to Start!

For 2 to 4 players.

Ages 6 and up.

(Synopsis by Hasbro)

As with most of the other games in this post, Sorry! is available in different versions. Sorry! Express is a travel edition, whilst Star Wars Sorry! is played on a Millennium Falcon game board.

Sleeping Queens

Rise and Shine! The Pancake Queen, the Ladybug Queen and ten of their closest friends have fallen under a sleeping spell and it’s your job to wake them up. Use strategy, quick thinking and a little luck to rouse these napping nobles from their royal slumbers. Play a knight to steal a queen or take a chance on a juggling jester. But watch out for wicked potions and dastardly dragons! The player who wakes the most queens wins.

For 2 to 5 players.

Ages 8 and up.

(Synopsis by Gamewright)

Gamewright, the makers of Sleeping Queens, has loads of great games. On their website, these are arranged by age, reflecting the complexity and length of each one. Examples include Elephant’s Trunk (ages 3 and up), Rat-a-Tat Cat (ages 6 and up), Frog Juice (ages 8 and up) and Forbidden Island (ages 10 and up). Having played a number of Gamewright games, I can highly recommend them.

Whilst researching this topic, I discovered a fabulous series of articles, Board in the Library, by John Pappas, a Library Branch Director from Philadelphia. He has a website, also entitled Board in the Library, which includes reviews of a wide range of board games and advice for hosting a games night. Although much of the information is aimed at an adult audience, it can be used as a starting point for selecting games for children and young adults to use in libraries. I had no idea there were so many interesting games out there!

More information about International Games Week can be found on the American Library Association website. There’s also a Puzzle Hunt based on games and play, which will be held online over five days. So thinking caps on everyone! Game on!!

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